U.S.
3:26 pm
Tue July 30, 2013

Where Do Drugs For Lethal Injections Come From? Few Know

A new law in Georgia makes information about where the state got its supply of lethal injection drugs a secret.
Ric Feld AP

Originally published on Tue July 30, 2013 5:45 pm

Several states are dealing with a shortage of lethal injection drugs and have had problems getting enough to carry out executions. In Georgia, lawmakers passed a measure that makes information about where the state got its supply a secret.

The Lethal Injection Secrecy Act says that the identity of people or companies that manufacture, supply or prescribe drugs used in executions is a state secret. But attorneys for death row inmate Warren Lee Hill are challenging the state over whether that law is constitutional.

Cruel And Unusual Punishment?

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Favorite Sessions
3:10 pm
Tue July 30, 2013

Yo La Tengo Shares A Tender Moment In 'Cornelia And Jane'

James McNew (left), Georgia Hubley and Ira Kaplan of Yo La Tengo perform live at opbmusic in Portland.
Corey Arnold opbmusic

Originally published on Fri August 16, 2013 2:54 pm

Nearly 30 years and 13 albums into a career marked by tireless creativity and remarkable consistency, Yo La Tengo's Georgia Hubley, Ira Kaplan and James McNew are much-loved and highly influential pioneers. That word seems as accurate a label as any, especially given that they laughed off the notion of being "godfathers" during our interview.

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Author Interviews
2:41 pm
Tue July 30, 2013

Pioneering 'Masters Of Sex' Brought Science To The Bedroom

Human sexuality researchers William Masters and Virginia Johnson Masters, shown in San Francisco in 1972.
AP

Originally published on Tue July 30, 2013 3:40 pm

William Masters and Virginia Johnson became famous in the 1960s for their groundbreaking and controversial research into the physiology of human sexuality. Instead of just asking people about their sex lives, Masters and Johnson actually observed volunteers engaging in self-stimulation and sexual intercourse. Changes throughout their bodies during arousal were measured with medical equipment.

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All Songs Considered
2:38 pm
Tue July 30, 2013

The Old Tiny Desk Gets Demolished

The old NPR building at 635 Massachusetts Ave. NW in Washington, D.C., was torn down in stages. This photo shows what the building looked like in late June.
NPR

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Shots - Health News
2:29 pm
Tue July 30, 2013

A Bit Of Thought Makes Finding Out Medical Risks Less Scary

Angelina Jolie took a genetic test to find out her risk of breast cancer, and had a preventive double mastectomy.
Alastair Grant PA Photos /Landov

Originally published on Tue July 30, 2013 4:39 pm

Would you want to know your risk of getting heart disease? Diabetes? Or an inherited form of breast cancer?

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Music
2:22 pm
Tue July 30, 2013

The Exchange, July 30

An encore presentation. Folk and roots music, and live performances and interviews with local musicians.

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The Two-Way
1:26 pm
Tue July 30, 2013

Ireland Enacts Law Providing For Abortion, A First

Ireland now has its first law making abortion legal in the country under specific conditions, after President Michael D. Higgins signed the Protection of Life During Pregnancy Bill 2013 into law Tuesday.

The legislation provides women with access to abortion in cases where their lives are at risk, including medical emergencies and cases in which suicide could be a factor.

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Music
1:06 pm
Tue July 30, 2013

Medicine Ball Caravan, July 30

The Onlies are scheduled for a lil' stop-by on Tuesday morning's MEDICINE BALL CARAVAN (11am-noon Central Standard on 88.7FM locally orĀ www.krvs.org) to spin from their latest release. Also: more local sounds from the likes of Mike Dean, Clay Parker, Caleb Elliott, Bas Clas, Jimmy Robinson, Sam Rey, the latest Preservation Hall Jazz Band and classic Potliquor.

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The Two-Way
12:17 pm
Tue July 30, 2013

Investigators: Train Conductor Was On Phone During Spain Crash

Flowers pay tribute to the victims of the train that crashed in northwestern Spain last week. The driver of the train was on the phone and traveling at nearly twice the speed limit, according to court papers.
Rafa Rivas AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Tue July 30, 2013 3:18 pm

The driver of a Spanish train that derailed and killed 79 people was speaking on the phone and had taken the train to nearly twice the speed allowed on the stretch of track where the crash occurred, according to court investigators who reviewed the train's "black box" recorders.

After reaching speeds of 119 miles per hour, train conductor Francisco Jose Garzon Amo tried to slow the train down "seconds before the crash," according to an Associated Press report on the court's preliminary findings, which were released Tuesday.

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All Tech Considered
12:12 pm
Tue July 30, 2013

Report: MIT Didn't Target Swartz; Missed 'Wider Background'

Internet activist Aaron Swartz at a rally in January 2012.
Daniel J. Sieradski Flickr

Originally published on Tue July 30, 2013 1:42 pm

In a long-awaited chronicle of its involvement in the prosecution of the late Internet activist Aaron Swartz, Massachusetts Institute of Technology officials released a 180-page report saying administrators never "targeted" the programmer and committed no wrongdoing. But the report raises questions about existing university policies and whether MIT should have stepped in to actively support Swartz, rather than take its "position of neutrality."

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