NPR Story
3:45 pm
Tue November 5, 2013

Beleaguered Florida Citrus Industry Hits New Snags

Originally published on Tue November 5, 2013 5:19 pm

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

Florida's citrus industry has a new problem. It's long wrestled with crop diseases like canker and greening. But the effort to halt greening has killed millions of bees, as growers have increased their use of pesticides.

And that, in turn, is straining relationships between citrus farmers and their longtime partners, beekeepers. Here's Ashley Lopez of member station WGCU.

ASHLEY LOPEZ, BYLINE: Harold Curtis runs an 1,100-acre grove in southwest Florida. He walks through the rows of trees, packed full of plump, juicy oranges.

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NPR Story
3:45 pm
Tue November 5, 2013

Study Says 40 Billion Planets In Our Galaxy Could Support Life

Originally published on Tue November 5, 2013 5:19 pm

Transcript

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

As China and India race to Mars, we'll venture outside our solar system and consider this mind-expanding possibility: There could be 40 billion planets in our Milky Way galaxy that are orbiting stars in a habitable zone that could support life - 40 billion. Makes you kind of puny, doesn't it?

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Environment
3:45 pm
Tue November 5, 2013

Thanks To Parasites, Moose Are Looking More Like Ghosts

A large bull moose is inspected by a hunter at a weigh station in Maine.
Robert F. Bukaty AP

Originally published on Tue November 5, 2013 5:48 pm

The news for moose is not good across the country's northern tier and in some parts of Canada. A recent and rapid decline of moose populations in many states may be linked to climate change, and to the parasites that benefit from it.

In Minnesota, moose populations have dropped from a high of more than 12,000 two decades ago to fewer than 3,000 now. Moose in some parts of Manitoba have declined by 50 percent and more.

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Technology
3:45 pm
Tue November 5, 2013

The Most Secure Password In The World Might Be You

The iPhone 5s includes a fingerprint scanner that can be used in lieu of a PIN or password. Some tech giants say finger or voice recognition is the wave of the future.
Graham Melling iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Tue November 5, 2013 8:22 pm

You're probably well-acquainted with one of life's little annoyances: the password.

Your voicemail. Your email. Your smartphone. Maybe you've got a different one for each — which means you're bound to slip up.

Or maybe you use the same one for everything — a security no-no. The number of sites and services that demand a password or PIN seems to have grown exponentially. And keeping track of the ones you've got? Forget about it.

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Code Switch
3:37 pm
Tue November 5, 2013

As City Grapples With Murder Rate, Police Chief Reaches Out

Just months after Wade Ingram became police chief in Gary, Ind., in January 2012, he began an unusual initiative: visiting the family of each of the city's homicide victims.

That's meant many visits for Ingram.

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The Two-Way
3:02 pm
Tue November 5, 2013

Saudi Authorities Round Up Thousands Of Illegal Immigrants

Originally published on Tue November 5, 2013 5:57 pm

After a seven-month grace period expired on Monday, Saudi authorities began rounding up thousands of illegal immigrants in cities across the kingdom.

Reuters reports the government hopes that deporting the immigrants will open up jobs for citizens of Saudi Arabia. The wire service reports:

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The Salt
2:49 pm
Tue November 5, 2013

Make Room For Mushrooms: Fungi Compete With Meat In Burgers

Richard Blais' Earth & Turf Burger, served at the Flip Burger Boutique in Atlanta, is 50 percent beef, 50 percent mushroom.
Courtesy of Flip Burger Boutique

Originally published on Tue November 5, 2013 5:00 pm

With so many people reconsidering their meat consumption, the mushroom industry is hoping their product can become the next "other" white meat.

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World Cafe
2:46 pm
Tue November 5, 2013

Willy Mason On World Cafe

Willy Mason.
Courtesy of the artist

Originally from Martha's Vineyard, New England singer-songwriter Willy Mason has enjoyed much of his success in Europe, where albums such as 2004's Where the Humans Eat and 2007's If the Ocean Gets Rough were met with wide acclaim.

After a six-year hiatus, Mason put out his third album, Carry On, in the U.K. last year; a U.S. release recently followed. This session marks the first time he's performed with a band at the WXPN studio.

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Music
2:36 pm
Tue November 5, 2013

The Exchange, November 5: 40 years of the UL Press

Folk and roots music, and live performances and interviews with local musicians.

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Author Interviews
2:10 pm
Tue November 5, 2013

Sales Take Center Stage: To Boost Morale, Companies Burst Into Song

Steve Young learned about industrial musicals when he started coming across compilations, like this one, in used record stores. (You definitely want to click to enlarge this.)
Courtesy of Blast Books

Originally published on Fri November 8, 2013 8:47 am

Why would someone write a sentimental ballad about a bathroom? For the same reason someone would write a rousing song about tractors: So the song could be used in what's called an industrial musical.

These musicals were like Broadway shows, but they were written and performed for corporate sales meetings and conventions from the 1950s to the 1980s. The lyrics were all about the products being sold and how to sell them. Some of them were lavish and costly, even though they'd be performed only once.

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