World Cafe
11:50 am
Fri July 5, 2013

Portugal. The Man On World Cafe

Portugal. The Man.
Hayley Young Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Fri October 4, 2013 10:05 am

Portugal. The Man is a shape-shifting indie-rock band originally from Wasilla, Alaska. Led by vocalist John Gourley, the group just released a new album called Evil Friends, which was produced by Brian Burton, a.k.a Danger Mouse. Burton helped the band capture the potential of each track, while lending a rhythmic feel to its psych-rock style.

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Song Travels
11:43 am
Fri July 5, 2013

Mark O'Connor On 'Song Travels'

Mark O'Connor.
Jim McGuire Courtesy of the artist

Violinist Mark O'Connor is one of the most versatile fiddlers in music today: He seems equally at home playing bluegrass, country, jazz and classical. With its roots in Texas fiddling, O'Connor's music has shaped an entirely American school of string playing. His approach to teaching violin is considered a rival to the Suzuki method.

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Middle East
11:37 am
Fri July 5, 2013

Shootings Reported At Demonstrations In Egypt

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

It's MORNING EDITION, from NPR News. I'm Renee Montagne.

This is a week when Egypt is divided on what democracy means. In what amounted to a second uprising, millions of Egyptians poured into the streets to demand that their democratically elected president step down. When he balked, the army ousted Mohamed Morsi, which led his supporters to say it is a dark day for democracy there. Today, thousands of Morsi supporters are out protesting that military coup, in demonstrations that have reportedly turned violent.

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Business
11:37 am
Fri July 5, 2013

June Jobs Report Exceeds Expectations, But Concerns Remain

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

NPR's business news starts with the jobs report.

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

Economy
11:21 am
Fri July 5, 2013

Four Years On, Economic Recovery Still Sluggish

June job numbers are out, and the unemployment rate is still 7.6%. As the U.S. enters its fifth year of recovery, guest host Celeste Headlee asks Sudeep Reddy of the Wall Street Journal where we go from here.

U.S.
11:21 am
Fri July 5, 2013

Understanding Migrants Through The Things They Carried

Transcript

CELESTE HEADLEE, HOST:

This is TELL ME MORE from NPR News. I'm Celeste Headlee. Michel Martin is away. Coming up, preachers serve as spiritual guides for their flocks, but what happens when a preacher loses his own faith? We'll talk with one man who knows what that's like in just a few minutes. But first, anthropologists and archaeologists, of course, study the way that groups live throughout history.

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Deceptive Cadence
11:03 am
Fri July 5, 2013

Behind The Music: Charles Ives

Pablo Helguera

Originally published on Fri July 26, 2013 9:49 am

In honor of our search for the great American symphony, here's an encore presentation of one of our favorite Artunes. Got an idea for a classical cartoon or a reaction to this one? Leave your thoughts in the comments section.

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Alt.Latino
10:30 am
Fri July 5, 2013

Spanish Hip-Hop, An Afro-Colombian Remix And More

This week on Alt.Latino, hear a song from Spanish rapper Mala Rodriguez's new album, Bruja.
Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Thu August 15, 2013 2:31 pm

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The Salt
10:16 am
Fri July 5, 2013

Farming Got Hip In Iran Some 12,000 Years Ago, Ancient Seeds Reveal

An ancient wild barley sample recovered from Chogha Golan, Iran.
Courtesy of TISARP/Science

Originally published on Mon July 8, 2013 10:46 am

Archaeologists digging in the foothills of Iran's Zagros Mountains have discovered the remains of a Stone Age farming community. It turns out that people living there were growing plants like barley, peas and lentils as early as 12,000 years ago.

The findings offer a rare snapshot of a time when humans first started experimenting with farming. They also show that Iran was an important player in the origin of agriculture.

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It's All Politics
10:08 am
Fri July 5, 2013

A Lively Political Press In A State Where Everything's Bigger

Texas reporters surround state Sen. Kirk Watson, D-Austin, on Monday.
Todd Wiseman Courtesy of Todd Wiseman

Originally published on Tue July 9, 2013 3:22 pm

All this week, NPR is taking a look at the demographic changes that could reshape the political landscape in Texas over the next decade — and what that could mean for the rest of the country. We take a closer look at the local journalists covering the coming changes, in this part of the series.

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