Music
9:07 am
Wed January 16, 2013

Passport to Modern Jazz, January 15

Exploration of modern jazz and its origins with your host D'jalma Garnier.

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Oscar Villalon is book editor at the San Francisco Chronicle. A member of the board of directors of the National Book Critics Circle, he's also a long-time juror of the California Book Awards, sponsored by the Commonwealth Club. His writing has appeared in the Virginia Quarterly Review and The Believer, and his reviews have aired on KQED's The California Report. He lives with his wife and son in San Francisco.

The Two-Way
8:51 am
Wed January 16, 2013

Before Obama's Plan Is Out, NRA Calls Him An 'Elitist Hypocrite'

National Rifle Association

Originally published on Wed January 16, 2013 10:50 am

  • On 'Morning Edition': NPR's Ari Shapiro reports

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Music
8:47 am
Wed January 16, 2013

Night Train Jazz, January 15

Mellow Jazz

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Music
8:27 am
Wed January 16, 2013

Bonjour Louisiane, January 16

Every morning, thousands of Cajun French music lovers tune in to KRVS to start their day with Pete Bergeron and "Bonjour Louisiane." Like morning coffee, "Bonjour Louisiane" gets you up and going with traditional Cajun French favorites and the latest releases from talented newcomers. Brush up on your French, find out about the fairs and festivals, and share the "joie de vivre" of French Louisiana.

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The Two-Way
7:51 am
Wed January 16, 2013

Inflation Rate Slowed Sharply In 2012; Prices Were Flat In December

The cost of a gallon of gas kept rising last year, but not at the torrid pace of 2010 and 2011. That helped keep inflation in check.
Joe Raedle Getty Images

Originally published on Wed January 16, 2013 9:21 am

Consumer prices rose just 1.7 percent in 2012, the Bureau of Labor Statistics reports. That's about half the pace of 2011 — when prices went up 3 percent.

In December, BLS says, prices were unchanged.

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The Two-Way
7:24 am
Wed January 16, 2013

Interior Sec. Salazar Is Latest Member Of Cabinet To Announce Departure

Interior Secretary Ken Salazar.
Streeter Lecka Getty Images

Originally published on Wed January 16, 2013 8:58 am

Interior Secretary Ken Salazar intends to step down at the end of March, his office confirms to NPR's Jeff Brady.

Word of Salazar's plan broke over night. According to The Denver Post, the former senator from Colorado intends to "return to Colorado to spend time with his family."

As the Post writes:

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The Two-Way
7:04 am
Wed January 16, 2013

Fireball, Panic As Helicopter Crashes In London

A firefighter walks toward some of the wreckage at the scene of today's helicopter crash in London.
Andy Rain EPA /LANDOV

Originally published on Wed January 16, 2013 9:00 am

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The Two-Way
6:39 am
Wed January 16, 2013

Blast Rocks Kabul; Dozens Wounded, Attackers Killed

Debris littered the street at the scene of today's attack in Kabul.
Sean Carberry NPR

Originally published on Wed January 16, 2013 7:57 am

Men wearing bombs strapped to their bodies and traveling in two vehicles carrying more explosives wounded dozens of civilians in Kabul today when they attacked a government security office, NPR's Sean Carberry reports from the scene.

Sean tells the NPR Newscast desk that the Taliban is claiming responsibility and that:

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Business
6:38 am
Wed January 16, 2013

Sick Workers' Dilemma: Stay Home Or Go To Work?

Chaim Gross, 24, is known as "Patient Zero" at his company Zeno Radio. About half of the workers have fallen ill in the past couple of months.
Ailsa Chang NPR

Originally published on Wed January 16, 2013 7:18 am

As the earliest flu outbreak in years continues to claim victims, businesses are taking a hit, too. They're faced with an unsolvable problem: If they tell too many sick employees to stay home, the work doesn't get done. But when people sick with flu and other bugs show up, they're spreading illness through the workplace.

It's a dilemma the staff at Zeno Radio, a media technology company in Midtown Manhattan, has seen unfold this winter.

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