Middle East
6:44 am
Sun May 13, 2012

Al-Qaida In Yemen: A New Top U.S. Priority

Originally published on Sun May 13, 2012 11:09 am

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

This is WEEKEND EDITION from NPR News. I'm Rachel Martin.

Terrorists are still targeting the U.S. homeland. We were reminded of that with news this past week that al-Qaida's affiliate in Yemen plotted to blow up a plane headed to the United States.

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Around the Nation
6:44 am
Sun May 13, 2012

Words Of Wisdom Commence For 2012 Grads

Originally published on Sun May 13, 2012 11:09 am

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

It's graduation season at colleges and universities around the country. And just as Mitt Romney addressed the students at Liberty University, other prominent politicians, entertainers and leaders are joining in that celebrated tradition. Here now, we present a composite commencement address for the class of 2012, drawn from some famous voices over the years.

(SOUNDBITE OF COMMENCEMENT SPEECHES)

PRESIDENT JOHN F. KENNEDY: Board of trustees, distinguished guests...

BARBARA BUSH: ...faculty, parents...

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NPR commentator Bonny Wolf grew up in Minnesota and has worked as a reporter and editor at newspapers in New Jersey and Texas. She taught journalism at Texas A&M University where she encouraged her student, Lyle Lovett, to give up music and get a real job. Wolf gives better advice about cooking and eating, and contributes her monthly food essay to NPR's award-winning Weekend Edition Sunday. She is also a contributing editor to "Kitchen Window," NPR's Web-only, weekly food column.

The Salt
6:08 am
Sun May 13, 2012

Bring On The 'Yabbies': Australia Ditches The Bad British Food

A fishmonger prepares her wares at the Sydney Fish Market.
Brendon Thorne Getty Images

Originally published on Mon May 14, 2012 6:35 am

Travel often brings the unexpected. But I was unprepared to find some of the best food I've ever eaten in Australia.

On a recent trip, we stopped at a café for lunch. An Australian woman we had seen earlier at a sheep dairy ran over and recommended the marron salad. "What is marron?" I asked.

"Well," she said, "you know what yabbies are."

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Middle East
5:33 am
Sun May 13, 2012

Largely Unseen, Syria Carries Out Arrest Campaign

Syrian President Bashar Assad's government has waged a two-pronged campaign against the opposition, critics say. His military continues to fight, while nonviolent activists are being detained in increasing numbers, according to monitoring groups.
AFP/Getty Images

President Bashar Assad's regime has launched a new and sweeping arrest campaign of opposition activists and intellectuals in the past few weeks, according to Western analysts and diplomats.

The growing tally of arrests has gone largely unnoticed, overshadowed by the daily violence that threatens to jeopardize the U.N. peace plan. But in combination, both are undermining the already faint hopes of peace.

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Author Interviews
5:24 am
Sun May 13, 2012

History, Heartbreak And 'The Chemistry Of Tears'

Originally published on Mon May 14, 2012 8:51 am

In Peter Carey's new novel, The Chemistry of Tears, the hero and the heroine are separated by 150 years. It is an object — a piece of technology — that brings Catherine and Henry together: An enormous, 19th-century, mechanical duck.

Catherine, a horologist — an expert on the inner workings of clocks — is restoring it in the present day. It's a distraction from the sudden death of her married lover. Henry, more than a century earlier, commissions the duck as a giant toy for his beloved, but very sick child.

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Humans
5:23 am
Sun May 13, 2012

Mayan Artwork Uncovered In A Guatemalan Forest

Conservator Angelyn Bass cleans and stabilizes the surface of a wall of a Mayan house that dates to the ninth century. The figure of a man who may have been the town scribe appears on the wall to her left.
Tyrone Turner Copyright 2012 National Geographic

Originally published on Tue May 15, 2012 4:27 pm

Archaeologists working in one of the most impenetrable rain forests in Guatemala have stumbled on a remarkable discovery: a room full of wall paintings and numerical calculations.

The buried room apparently was a workshop used by scribes or astronomers working for a Mayan king. The paintings depict the king and members of his court. The numbers mark important periods in the Mayan calendar.

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Author Interviews
5:22 am
Sun May 13, 2012

Three Pilgrimages To Gain 'A Sense Of Direction'

iStockphoto

Originally published on Sun May 13, 2012 11:09 am

Gideon Lewis-Kraus was confused. A few years ago, the American 20-something was living in Berlin, hanging out in art galleries and nameless speak-easies, preoccupied with living a creatively meaningful life, but unsure what that meant or how to make it happen.

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Music News
5:22 am
Sun May 13, 2012

Gil Evans, Essential Jazz Arranger, At 100

Gil Evans in the studio with Miles Davis, circa 1970.
Michael Ochs Archives

Originally published on Fri May 18, 2012 5:01 pm

Gil Evans, one of the most important jazz arrangers of the 20th century, was born 100 years ago today.

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Art & Design
5:21 am
Sun May 13, 2012

Steve Jobs Didn't Invent Design, But He Patented It

Steve Jobs filed more than 300 patents, now on display at the Smithsonian's S. Dillon Ripley Center in Washington, D.C.
Melisa Goh NPR

Originally published on Sun May 13, 2012 2:59 pm

U.S. Patent No. D486486 reads: "A display device with a moveable assembly attached to a flat panel display and to a base." Then there's Patent No. D469109, "the ornamental design for a media player, substantially as shown and described."

Those are just a couple of the more than 300 patents that bear the name Steven P. Jobs, the late CEO of Apple. A new exhibition opened on Friday at the Smithsonian's Ripley Center in Washington, D.C., titled The Patents and Trademarks of Steve Jobs: Art and Technology that Changed the World.

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