Middle East
6:20 am
Tue July 29, 2014

For Two Years, He Smuggled Photos Of Torture Victims Out Of Syria

This is one of the some 55,000 images the former Syrian military police photographer known as Caesar smuggled out of the country between 2011 and 2013. The regime used numbers — written on white cards and sometimes directly on the skin — to identify the dead, which branch of the Syrian government had held them, and when they died.
Courtesy of Syrian Emergency Task Force

Originally published on Tue July 29, 2014 2:01 pm

Warning: This report contains descriptions and an image that could disturb some readers.

The savage and protracted conflict in Syria has left more than 170,000 dead. Now, there are allegations of torture and killing of political prisoners opposed to the regime of Syrian President Bashar Assad.

Those allegations appear to be supported by evidence: tens of thousands of photographs.

The man who says he took the pictures worked as a military police photographer for the Assad regime and defected last year.

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The Two-Way
6:20 am
Tue July 29, 2014

Israel's Prime Minister Says Gaza War Could Be 'Prolonged'

In the morgue of Gaza's Shifa hospital, Palestinian relatives mourn following an explosion that reportedly killed at least 10 people Monday, nine of them said to be children.
Adel Hana AP

Originally published on Tue July 29, 2014 9:43 am

Despite calls from the United Nations for a cease-fire, Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu warned his country to prepare for a "prolonged" war.

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U.S.
6:00 am
Tue July 29, 2014

N.H. Promises To Let D.C. Residents Buy Booze There

Originally published on Tue July 29, 2014 6:35 am

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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Parallels
5:11 am
Tue July 29, 2014

For Iraqis In Crisis, Dividing The Country Seems A Poor Solution

A volunteer at a Christian church in Qosh, Iraq, loads aid onto a handcart Monday for delivery to displaced Shiites who are sheltering there.
Alice Fordham NPR

Originally published on Tue July 29, 2014 6:35 am

The muscular farmer sits in the basement kindergarten of the church, perched on a tiny chair intended for a child. He and his family are spending the holiday here, after being forced to flee from extremists.

"Our village is more than 300 years old," Ahmed Ali says of Shreikhan, near Mosul, "and we never had any such problems."

For most Muslims around the world, Eid is a time for gifts, feasts and visiting relatives. But for him and others in a militant-controlled swath of northwest Iraq, it's a strange and unhappy holiday.

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Business
4:38 am
Tue July 29, 2014

Zillow To Buy Rival Real Estate Site Trulia

Originally published on Tue July 29, 2014 6:35 am

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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Latin America
4:35 am
Tue July 29, 2014

Venezuelans Celebrate Chavez With A Focus On His Handwriting

Originally published on Tue July 29, 2014 6:35 am

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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Sports
3:56 am
Tue July 29, 2014

What Ray Rice's 2-Game Suspension For Assault Says About The NFL

Originally published on Tue July 29, 2014 9:50 am

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

NPR Story
3:56 am
Tue July 29, 2014

On NASA's Birthday, Mars Rover Sets A Mileage Record

Originally published on Tue July 29, 2014 6:35 am

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Parallels
3:56 am
Tue July 29, 2014

Uber, Airbnb Under Attack In Spain As Old And New Economies Clash

Taxi drivers protest against Uber, an on-demand car service app, during a 24-hour strike July 1 in Barcelona, Spain. They say it undercuts their business and are calling for the government to ban it.
David Ramos Getty Images

Originally published on Tue July 29, 2014 6:43 am

This summer, more people than ever before are booking rooms on Airbnb and using carpooling websites and smartphone apps to get around on vacation. The new "share economy" can be a money saver in areas hard hit by the economic crisis, like southern Europe.

But in sunny Spain, authorities are cracking down.

In Barcelona — one of the top destinations for European tourists this summer — police are pulling over and ticketing drivers suspected of using the private taxi app Uber.

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History
3:56 am
Tue July 29, 2014

Ghost Cats And Musket Balls: Stories Told By Capitol Interns

Interns who host tours on Capitol Hill, stopping at sites like the small Senate rotunda, don't always have their facts straight.
The Architect of the Capitol

Originally published on Tue July 29, 2014 10:04 pm

Every summer thousands of interns flood the offices of Capitol Hill. One of their primary duties is to give constituents tours of the famous buildings. They parade visitors from the rotunda to statuary hall, offering stories and anecdotes.

But while these intern tours provide a great deal of information, they are sometimes a little short on actual history.

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