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Asia
6:18 am
Tue November 5, 2013

Japanese Burger Chain Finds Way To Appeal To Women

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Good morning. I'm Renee Montagne. In Japan, a small mouth is considered so attractive on a woman there's a word for it - ochobo - which was a big problem for the country's biggest burger chain. The huge classic burger was a hit with guys but the women and girls weren't biting. So the burger chain introduced a wrapper with a large triangle featuring a serene face, which hides the real mouth chowing down on the burger. And sales to women have gone way up. It's MORNING EDITION. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.

The Two-Way
6:17 am
Tue November 5, 2013

Book News: Mozambican Writer Wins Neustadt Prize, 'America's Nobel'

Mia Couto received the Camoes Prize, the most important literary award for the Portuguese language, in June.
Francisco Seco AP

The daily lowdown on books, publishing, and the occasional author behaving badly.

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Around the Nation
6:12 am
Tue November 5, 2013

Pot And Beer On State Ballots This Election Day

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Good morning, I'm Steve Inskeep.

This Election Day is a moment of reckoning for controlled substances. Having legalized marijuana, Colorado votes whether to impose a 25 percent tax. For a while there opponents were building support by handing out free joints. Portland, Maine will decide whether to legalize pot. And Hyde Park, Utah votes on a different substance. Nationwide Prohibition ended in the '30s but remains in Hyde Park, which is deciding whether to allow beer.

New In Paperback
6:03 am
Tue November 5, 2013

Nov. 4-10: 'On The Map,' Beneath The Big Top And In Detroit

*Some of the language in the summaries above has been provided by publishers.

Copyright 2013 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Book Reviews
6:03 am
Tue November 5, 2013

'Boy Detective' Walks Down Memory Lane, But Doesn't Get Anywhere

There's a difference between ruminating and rambling, and Roger Rosenblatt crosses the line in The Boy Detective, his dilatory, meandering new memoir about his New York boyhood. I was a big fan of Kayak Morning, Rosenblatt's meditation on the tenaciousness of grief published in early 2012, four years after the sudden death of his 38-year-old daughter, a pediatrician and mother of three small children. But his latest, while less melancholic, more playful, and occasionally endearingly quirky, ambles at a pace that makes rush hour traffic down Second Avenue seem speedy.

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