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Arts & Life
11:24 am
Mon October 7, 2013

An Artist's Story Of The Arab Spring

Upheaval in countries like Egypt and Syria is often discussed in political terms, but how do artists see it? Guest host Celeste Headlee talks about arts and the Arab Spring with Egyptian-American poet Yahia Lababidi and Syrian-American doctor Dr. Zaher Sahloul.

World
11:24 am
Mon October 7, 2013

Has The US Forgotten Egypt?

Transcript

CELESTE HEADLEE, HOST:

This is TELL ME MORE from NPR News. I'm Celeste Headlee. Michel Martin is away. We're going to spend some time talking now about Egypt, where more than 50 people were killed over the weekend in clashes between the military and supporters of ousted president Mohamed Morsi. In a moment, we'll speak to an Egyptian-American who has written poetry inspired by the unrest there.

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Politics
11:24 am
Mon October 7, 2013

Govt. Shutdown: Does The Minority Rule?

Transcript

CELESTE HEADLEE, HOST:

This is TELL ME MORE from NPR News. I'm Celeste Headlee. Coming up, diplomats around the world continue to pay close attention to the events in Syria and Iran, but one scholar explains why we shouldn't forget about Egypt. That's in a few minutes.

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Shots - Health News
11:01 am
Mon October 7, 2013

Nobel Winners Decoded How Neurons And Cells Talk To Each Other

From left: Randy Schekman, Thomas Suedhof and James Rothman shared the 2013 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine.
Reuters /Landov

The three scientists who shared this year's Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine all made discoveries that illuminate how the body's cells communicate.

The research has sweeping implications for our understanding of how nerves in the brain transmit signals, how the immune system attacks pathogens and how hormones, like insulin, get into the bloodstream.

Bioengineers have already harnessed the discoveries to manufacture new vaccines and improve the quality of insulin for diabetics.

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The Salt
10:56 am
Mon October 7, 2013

Labor-Starved Pear Farmers Buckle Under Bumper Crop

Some of this season's Comice pear harvest is rotting in Pacific Northwest orchards because there aren't enough workers to pick it.
Deena Prichep for NPR

Originally published on Mon October 7, 2013 12:12 pm

It's always a bit sad to say goodbye to summer corn and tomatoes, and settle into fall.

There are consolations, though — like the new crop of pears. Over 80 percent of America's fresh pears are grown in the Pacific Northwest, and this year's harvest is slated to be one of the biggest on record.

But some of the fruit is rotting in the orchards because there aren't enough workers to pick them.

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