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5:50 am
Sun June 9, 2013

Jack White Rescues Legendary Detroit Theater

Originally published on Sun June 9, 2013 11:58 am

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

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The Sunday Conversation
5:50 am
Sun June 9, 2013

Making The Switch: An American Woman's Journey To Islam

Karen Danielson, who was raised Catholic, converted to Islam 30 years ago.
Courtesy of the Muslim American Society Chicago

Originally published on Sun June 9, 2013 1:35 pm

Each week, Weekend Edition Sunday host Rachel Martin brings listeners an unexpected side of the news by talking with someone personally affected by the stories making headlines.

Karen Danielson converted to Islam three decades ago, was she was 19. She was raised Catholic, and then later became a Baptist and enrolled in a Baptist college, where she picked up the Koran. Now, she's the director of outreach at the Chicago chapter of the Muslim American Society.

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Alt.Latino: Show
5:26 am
Sun June 9, 2013

Can't Stop The Beat: Three New Caribbean Artists Making Waves

Alt.Latino's hosts are convinced that Cuban singer Danay Suarez is a legend in the making.
Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Sun June 9, 2013 11:58 am

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Author Interviews
5:26 am
Sun June 9, 2013

Scheherazade: From Storytelling 'Slave' To 'First Feminist'

iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Sun June 9, 2013 11:58 am

The stories of One Thousand and One Nights are among the world's most famous works of literature. They start with a king who discovers that his wife is having an affair. In a fit of rage, he has her executed. Lebanese author Hanan al-Shaykh explains what happens next:

"From that night, he decreed a law that he will marry a virgin every single day and deflower her at night, and then kill her at dawn," al-Shaykh tells NPR's Rachel Martin.

The killing continues until Scheherazade, the daughter of the king's vizier, offers herself as the king's bride.

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Parallels
5:26 am
Sun June 9, 2013

In Colombia, A Town Badly Scarred By Wartime Rape

Isabel Narvaez, in El Placer, says she is still traumatized by the rape she suffered. The small hamlet in Colombia is just one place where women were victims of violent crimes during the civil conflict.
Paul Smith for NPR

Originally published on Tue July 2, 2013 4:08 pm

El Placer is a remote hamlet deep in southern Colombia, on the edge of the Amazon. Founded half a century ago by farmers who found it fertile and bucolic, its name means "The Pleasure."

But for women and girls in El Placer who suffered years of sexual assaults after an illegal armed group stormed in, the name is only associated with unspeakable violence and murder.

Brigitte CarreƱo, 25, is among the women who suffered. A feared local warlord in El Placer raped her when she was 12, leaving her with searing memories that remain vivid and painful to this day.

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