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National Security
2:11 pm
Wed September 11, 2013

Reporter Had To Decide If Snowden Leaks Were 'The Real Thing'

According to Barton Gellman, Edward Snowden (above) specifically asked journalists not to make all the documents he leaked available to the public.
Getty Images

Originally published on Wed September 11, 2013 3:21 pm

Since the beginning of June, Barton Gellman has been reporting on classified intelligence documents given to him by Edward Snowden, a former National Security Agency contractor. As a result of the Snowden leaks, Gellman and reporter Laura Poitras broke the story of the PRISM program, which mines data from nine U.S. Internet companies, including Microsoft, Yahoo, Google and Facebook.

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The Two-Way
2:10 pm
Wed September 11, 2013

Vatican's Secretary Of State Says Celibacy Is An Open Question

Pietro Parolin in 2009.
Hoang Dinh Nam AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Wed September 11, 2013 3:33 pm

The Vatican's new secretary of state made some comments in an interview with a Venezuelan newspaper earlier this week that have surprised many.

Archbishop Pietro Parolin, whom Pope Francis appointed on Aug. 31, said the issue of priest celibacy is open to discussion.

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The Two-Way
1:55 pm
Wed September 11, 2013

Discovery Of Massive Aquifers Could Be Game Changer For Kenya

Members of the El Molo tribe are pictured in the village of Komote, on the shores of Lake Turkana, northern Kenya, last year.
Carl De Souza AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Wed September 11, 2013 3:07 pm

Satellite imagery and seismic data have identified two huge underground aquifers in Kenya's drought-prone north, a discovery that could be "a game changer" for the country, NPR's Gregory Warner reports.

The aquifers, located hundreds of feet underground in the Turkana region that borders Ethiopia and South Sudan, contain billions of gallons of water, according to UNESCO, which confirmed the existence of the subterranean lakes discovered with the help of a French company using technology originally designed to reveal oil deposits.

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Field Recordings
1:12 pm
Wed September 11, 2013

Bill Callahan Sings 'Small Plane' In A Serene City

Bill Callahan in the 6th and B Community Garden.
Mito Habe-Evans NPR

Originally published on Tue July 8, 2014 7:52 am

When we first approached Bill Callahan to do a Field Recording in New York City, we asked him if he had any special place in mind. His reply surprised me: "A community garden." I guess I'd stereotyped him in my head, because after all those years of dark, thoughtful songwriting — first as Smog and then on the pensive records he's made under his own name — I'd imagined a library, someplace quiet and dark.

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The Two-Way
1:05 pm
Wed September 11, 2013

U.S. Troops Oppose Striking Syria, Online Survey Suggests

Members of the U.S. Marine Corps listen to President Obama during his visit to Camp Pendleton, Calif., in August.
Kevork Djansezian Getty Images

An online survey of 750 active-duty U.S. troops suggests that opposition to striking Syria is "more intense" among military personnel than among the American public.

Military Times, a publication and newssite owned by Gannett Co. (not the federal government) reports that:

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