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The Two-Way
4:18 pm
Wed July 24, 2013

Why The Latest Gulf Leak Is No BP Disaster

Fire boats battle a fire at the off shore oil rig Deepwater Horizon in April 2010.
U.S. Coast Guard Getty Images

Originally published on Wed July 24, 2013 5:06 pm

Teams of workers are mobilizing in the Gulf of Mexico to try to stem a natural gas leak at an offshore drilling rig that exploded and caught fire Tuesday. The rig off the Louisiana coast has been partially destroyed by the out of control blaze, and firefighting boats are on the scene.

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On Aging
4:18 pm
Wed July 24, 2013

Move Over Nursing Homes — There's Something Different

There are no strict schedules at Green House homes, so resident Charles Tyler, 72, is free to stay in his recliner in the living room during mealtimes.
Ina Jaffe NPR

Originally published on Wed July 24, 2013 6:21 pm

One thing just about everyone dreads as they age is the possibility of ending up in a nursing home. We all think we know what that's like: sharing a room with strangers, sitting slumped in a wheelchair all day, rigid schedules, bad smells. And for more than 1 million Americans, this is home. But there's an effort to change all that, and it's known as The Green House Project.

In the past 10 years, more than 140 of these alternative, nonprofit nursing homes have been built in 24 states.

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Shots - Health News
4:17 pm
Wed July 24, 2013

How A Family Copes With Schizophrenia And Suicide

Homer Bell's family: sister Laura Bell (from left), sister Regina Bell, mother Rosalind Scott and stepfather Jack Wilcox.
Jeff Cohen WNPR

Originally published on Wed July 24, 2013 6:21 pm

Homer Bell was 54 years old when he killed himself in April in a very public way — he laid down his head in front of a stopped bus in his hometown of Hartford, Conn. It was the last act in a life filled with struggle, as Bell and his family endured his schizophrenia.

At a time when there are calls to strengthen the mental health system, Bell's story shows how hard coping with mental illness can be.

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Code Switch
4:01 pm
Wed July 24, 2013

How The Death Of A 12-Year-Old Changed The City Of Dallas

Twelve-year-old Santos Rodriguez was shot and killed by a police officer in Dallas on July 24, 1973.
Courtesy of the Dallas Mexican American Historical League

Originally published on Wed July 24, 2013 6:21 pm

Forty years ago, thousands of Mexican-Americans in Dallas, Texas came together for a protest at city hall. Four days earlier, a white police officer had shot and killed 12-year-old Santos Rodriguez. The death of Rodriguez sparked a riot. Eventually, it later spurred change that led to political representation and more Mexican-Americans on the police force.

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Music
3:45 pm
Wed July 24, 2013

Remembering Tupac's Breakout Album, 20 Years Later

Originally published on Wed July 24, 2013 6:21 pm

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

Well, now to a more recent moment in history, a year that helped change the sound of America, 1993. The Wu-Tang Clan, Snoop Dogg, A Tribe Called Quest, Queen Latifah and more than a dozen other rap groups released albums that year. The list includes a breakout album from one the most influential rappers ever to hold a microphone.

NPR's Sami Yenigun has his story.

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