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World Cafe
4:00 pm
Mon July 1, 2013

World Cafe Next: Elastic Bond

Elastic Bond.
Alissa Christine Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Fri October 4, 2013 10:16 am

The Miami-based Latin alternative band Elastic Bond has a varied sound that's hard to pinpoint. Its debut album, Real, contains tropical elements well suited to its home state of Florida, but funky horns and retro-leaning samples help freshen that sound. The combination of genres goes well with the band's name, which references a chemical equation.

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The Two-Way
3:36 pm
Mon July 1, 2013

Calif. Judge Rules Yoga In Public Schools Not Religious

Third-graders at Olivenhain Pioneer Elementary School in Encinitas, Calif., perform chair pose with instructor Kristen McCloskey in December 2012.
Kyla Calvert for NPR

Originally published on Mon July 1, 2013 3:39 pm

Earlier this year, we told you about some parents in the San Diego area who were suing the Encinitas Union School District to stop yoga classes because they believed the ancient Indian practice had religious overtones. Well, today we have a decision in that case: A judge ruled that the school district was not teaching religion when it offered elementary school students yoga classes.

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It's All Politics
3:32 pm
Mon July 1, 2013

Will Texas Become A Presidential Battleground?

Texas was decidedly red on the electoral map in NBC News' "Election Plaza" in New York's Rockefeller Center in 2008. Do Democrats really have a chance to turn it blue in the future?
Mary Altaffer AP

Originally published on Mon July 1, 2013 5:11 pm

All this week, NPR is taking a look at the demographic changes that could reshape the political landscape in Texas over the next decade — and what that could mean for the rest of the country.

With the two parties in Washington gridlocked on immigration, the budget and other issues, it's easy to forget that when it comes to winning presidential elections, one party has a distinct advantage.

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Digital Life
3:32 pm
Mon July 1, 2013

Kids Unplugged: Summer Camps Ban Electronics

Camp Sloane director Andrew Keener, staff and campers gather for an end of the year campfire last year.
Courtesy of Camp Sloane

Originally published on Mon July 1, 2013 5:31 pm

A decade ago, many summer camps nationwide started instituting a no-tech policy, banning cellphones, pagers and electronic games.

Camp Manitou-Lin in Middleville, Mich., had just started banning electronics at the start of summer in 2003.

Back then, 11-year-old Michael Lake of Grand Rapids was not so enthusiastic about the new policy. "I live on my Game Boy. When I get home, I'm going to need two packs of batteries," he said.

Cut to 2013, and the Xbox, Instagram, iPhone and iPad. Technology has dramatically changed, and yet some things have stayed the same.

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Parallels
3:32 pm
Mon July 1, 2013

In A Rough Neighborhood, Jordan Clings To Its Stability

Jordanian protesters chant slogans against corruption during a March 15 anti-government demonstration in Amman. Jordanians have held Arab Spring-inspired protests since 2011, demanding political reforms and anti-corruption measures. The protests have been peaceful.
Khalil Mazraawi AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Tue July 2, 2013 1:19 am

Across the turbulent Middle East, Arab revolts have toppled dictators and strongmen. Jordan remains stable for now but the pressure is mounting.

The Syrian war rages right next door, sending a flood of refugees across the border that has strained every resource in the kingdom.

Jordan shares the region's troubles: a faltering economy; rampant unemployment, especially among the young; and a popular demand for a say in how the country is governed.

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