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Piano Jazz With Jon Weber
4:31 pm
Fri May 31, 2013

Linda Oh On Piano Jazz

Linda Oh.
Vincent Soyez Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Fri May 31, 2013 5:21 pm

With the bass, "you have a lot more power than you may think," Linda Oh says. Born in Malaysia to Chinese parents, her family moved to Western Australia, where she started out playing bass in rock bands. Since discovering the double bass, Oh become a steady presence on the scene, whether playing with a string quartet, composing for film or covering the Red Hot Chili Peppers, which she does here with "Soul to Squeeze" in a set with host Jon Weber.

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The Two-Way
4:31 pm
Fri May 31, 2013

'Atari Dump' Will Be Excavated, After Nearly 30 Years

The "Atari Dump" of New Mexico, where the game company rid itself of unsold game cartridges, will be excavated this summer. Here, a file photo shows a woman demonstrating Atari's unreleased 1984 Mindlink device, using a headband that picks up impulses from movement of the player's forehead.
Charlie Knoblock AP

Originally published on Fri May 31, 2013 5:59 pm

The New Mexico landfill or "Atari Dump" where the game console maker buried its mistakes — the biggest being the game E.T. The Extra-Terrestrial — will be dug up by game developer Fuel Industries, which hopes to make a documentary about the project.

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Author Interviews
4:04 pm
Fri May 31, 2013

Sex Overseas: 'What Soldiers Do' Complicates WWII History

Cover of What Soldiers Do

Originally published on Fri May 31, 2013 8:23 pm

Americans often think of World War II as the "good war," but historian Mary Louise Roberts says her new book might make our understanding of that conflict "more truthful and more complex." The book, What Soldiers Do: Sex and the American GI in World War II France, tells the story of relations between American men and French women in Normandy and elsewhere.

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Remembering Heroes Of The Second World War
4:04 pm
Fri May 31, 2013

Army Nurse Mildred Manning: An 'Angel' POW With A Job To Do

Mildred Manning, then Mildred Dalton, was serving as a U.S. Army nurse in the Philippines when she was taken prisoner by Japanese forces in 1942.
U.S. Army

Originally published on Fri May 31, 2013 8:23 pm

Sixteen million men and women served in uniform during World War II. Today, 1.2 million are still alive, but hundreds of those vets are dying every day. In honor of Memorial Day, NPR's All Things Considered is remembering some of the veterans who died this year.

There were no "typical" tours of duty in World War II, but U.S. Army nurse Mildred Dalton Manning's was particularly extraordinary. Manning, along with six dozen other nurses, was held captive by the Japanese for almost three years. The group became known as the "Angels of Bataan and Corregidor."

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From Our Listeners
4:04 pm
Fri May 31, 2013

What Was Your Worst Vacation Ever?

Originally published on Fri May 31, 2013 8:23 pm

Transcript

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

Perhaps you are one of the lucky ones, and you've never had your holiday plans spoiled by unforeseen events: bad weather, misplaced reservations. But if you haven't been so lucky, then you may have...

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

Vacation horror stories. Nothing tragic, just a cascade of annoyances, a series of unfortunate happenings that ruined a holiday dream but with the passage of time made a swell story.

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