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'Another Thing': Test Your Clever Skills
3:55 pm
Mon October 15, 2012

'Another Thing' Wraps With Songs Of Housework Woe

iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Mon October 15, 2012 5:46 pm

Each week, All Things Considered and Lenore Skenazy, author of the book and blog Free-Range Kids, have brought you "Another Thing," an on-air puzzle to test your cleverness skills. The contest wraps up this week with one final installment of listener responses.

Last week's challenge: A Norwegian study found that couples who split chores equally are more likely to divorce. Come up with the name of a country song about a chore-splitting couple.

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The Two-Way
3:51 pm
Mon October 15, 2012

Bosnia Begins Work On First Census Since Its Bloody Civil War

July 11, 2012: A woman cried next to the coffin of her relative at the Potocari memorial complex near Srebrenica. More than 8,000 Muslim men and boys were executed there in July 1995. It was the worst massacre in Europe since World War II.
Marko Drobnjakovic AP

Population censuses aren't normally something to get excited over. But for Bosnia, a nation that hasn't counted its own people in over two decades and has its eye on becoming part of the European Union, even a pilot census is of great importance. No formal national count has taken place since before the breakup of Yugoslavia, and the subsequent ethnic conflict that shocked the world.

Today, Bosnia began a two-week test census, targeting around 15,000 people, in order to gauge how prepared it is for an official, nation-wide census in the spring of 2013.

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Shots - Health News
3:33 pm
Mon October 15, 2012

Wiping Out Polio: How The U.S. Snuffed Out A Killer

On April 12, 1955, Dr. Jonas Salk and his research team at the University of Pittsburgh released the first successful vaccine for polio. In 1979, the U.S. reported its last case of the paralyzing virus.
Courtesy of Images from the History of Medicine (NLM).

Originally published on Wed January 23, 2013 1:55 pm

Sixty years ago, polio was one of the most feared diseases in the U.S.

As the weather warmed up each year, panic over polio intensified. Late summer was dubbed "polio season." Public swimming pools were shut down. Movie theaters urged patrons not to sit too close together to avoid spreading the disease. Insurance companies started selling polio insurance for newborns.

The fear was well grounded. By the 1950s, polio had become one of the most serious communicable diseases among children in the United States.

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Solve This
3:17 pm
Mon October 15, 2012

Candidates' Views On Poverty Get Little Attention

People eat a free community meal at The Center in Lima, Ohio, earlier this year. Although more than 46 million Americans are poor, the issue has gotten little attention in the presidential race.
Mario Tama Getty Images

Originally published on Mon October 15, 2012 5:46 pm

The nation's poverty rate is as high as it's been in almost two decades. Last year, 1 in 6 Americans was poor — more than 46 million people, including 16 million children.

But on the campaign trail, the issue of poverty has received surprisingly little attention.

When he first ran for president, Barack Obama went to a low-income neighborhood in Washington, D.C., and spoke passionately about hunger and poverty. He repeated Bobby Kennedy's question in 1967: "How can a country like this allow it?"

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Tiny Desk Concerts
3:08 pm
Mon October 15, 2012

Dirty Three: Tiny Desk Concert

Dirty Three plays a Tiny Desk Concert on Sept. 24.
Lauren Rock NPR

Every member of Dirty Three has a highly respectable career outside of the band: Violinist Warren Ellis works closely with Nick Cave, drummer Jim White is a sought-after collaborator with an instantly recognizable sound, and guitarist Mick Turner has released a string of gorgeous instrumental solo albums when he's not working as a visual artis

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