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Around the Nation
6:55 am
Sun October 7, 2012

Thousands Hold Fast To Tradition Of Oral Storytelling

Originally published on Tue October 9, 2012 12:24 pm

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

Before Twitter, radio, even electricity - in fact, going all the way back to pre-historic times, people gathered around fires to listen to stories. Even though the glow of computers has replaced the warmth of the campfire for most of us, some folks still hold fast to the tradition of oral storytelling.

As Missy Shelton reports, nearly 10,000 people have gathered this weekend for the National Storytelling Festival in northeast Tennessee to hear professional tellers weave some good yarns.

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The Record
6:03 am
Sun October 7, 2012

Rock Hall Nominations: Who, Why And How Likely Are They To Be Inducted?

Donna Summer performs in October 2011. Summer, who died in May, is nominated for the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame this year for the fifth time.
Ethan Miller Getty Images

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The Two-Way
5:50 am
Sun October 7, 2012

The U.N.'s 'Superhero Man': A Rocking Tribute To A Humanitarian

A Norwegian comedy duo managed something rare: to get concert goers cheering for a U.N. official.
YouTube.com

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The Picture Show
5:15 am
Sun October 7, 2012

Catching The 'Shadow' Of A Lost World

Wedding party, 1914. A still from the film In the Land of the Head Hunters, in which Curtis sought to re-create a mythic story of the Kwakiutl.
Edward Curtis Library of Congress

Originally published on Tue October 9, 2012 12:24 pm

Photographer Edward Curtis started off his career at the tail end of the 19th century, making portraits of Seattle's wealthiest citizens. But a preoccupation with Native Americans and a chance encounter on a mountaintop triggered an idea: Curtis decided to chronicle the experience of the vanishing tribes — all of them. It was an unbelievably ambitious project that would define Curtis, his work and his legacy.

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Author Interviews
5:11 am
Sun October 7, 2012

'Wooden Floors' Pack Hidden Thrill In Author's Debut

Wooden floor and chair
iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Tue October 9, 2012 12:24 pm

Housesitting is a delicate chore. It involves inhabiting someone else's home — their personal space, watching over their stuff — and sticking to the Boy Scouts' creed to leave no trace. That's pretty much the opposite of what happens in Will Wiles' debut novel, Care of Wooden Floors. It's the story of an already strained friendship pushed to the breaking point by a housesitting favor gone terribly, terribly wrong.

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