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1:03 am
Sat January 19, 2013

Jin, 'The Chinese Kid Who Raps,' Grows Up

After a failed career at home in the U.S., the Chinese-American rapper Jin found an unexpected second chance at stardom on the other side of the world.
Louis Trinh Courtesy of artist

Originally published on Sat January 19, 2013 6:25 pm

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Music Interviews
1:03 am
Sat January 19, 2013

A Bagpipe-Slinging Spaniard Finds A Home In New York Jazz

On the new album Migrations, Cristina Pato plays the gaita, a bagpipe from her native region of Galicia in northwest Spain.
Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Sat January 19, 2013 1:18 pm

Cristina Pato is a jazz pianist from Spain who also plays flute and sings. But on her new album, Migrations, there's a striking sound not often heard in jazz: a bagpipe. Pato has been playing the traditional gaita (pronounced "GY-tah"), a version of the bagpipe from her native region of Galicia, since she was 4 years old.

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Wait Wait...Don't Tell Me!
5:44 pm
Fri January 18, 2013

Melinda Gates Plays Not My Job

Courtesy Melinda Gates

Originally published on Tue January 22, 2013 11:19 am

Back in the early 1990s, Melinda French was a rising star at a software company when the boss asked her out on a date. This was complicated because he was her boss, and frankly, he was kind of a nerd. But they fell in love and got married, and decided to raise a family, retire from the business, and in their spare time give away more money to charity than anyone else in the history of the world.

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All Songs Considered
5:26 pm
Fri January 18, 2013

Watch A Supergroup From Mali Sing For Peace

Fatoumata Diawara and some of her musical collaborators on "Voices United for Mali" at a press conference held in Bamako, Mali on Jan. 17, 2013.
Moustapha Diallo courtesy of the artists

Originally published on Tue January 22, 2013 9:33 am

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The Two-Way
5:21 pm
Fri January 18, 2013

'Invasive' Body Scanners Will Be Removed From Airports

A sign informs travelers about Millimeter Wave Detection technology used in full body scanners at Midway Airport in Chicago. The scanners produce less-revealing images than those that use X-rays.
Scott Olson Getty Images

The Transportation Security Administration will remove controversial body scanners from airport security after OSI Systems Inc. didn't update its machines' software to make scanned images of airline passengers less revealing.

"It became clear to TSA they would be unable to meet our timeline," Karen Shelton Waters the agency's assistant administrator for acquisitions told Bloomberg News. "As a result of that, we terminated the contract for the convenience of the government."

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