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Mountain Stage
3:22 pm
Thu November 15, 2012

The Lost Brothers On Mountain Stage

Brian Blauser Mountain Stage

Originally published on Thu June 19, 2014 1:44 pm

The Irish indie-folk duo The Lost Brothers makes its first appearance on Mountain Stage, recorded live on the campus of Ohio University in Athens. Oisin Leech and Mark McCausland aren't actually brothers; they met nearly a decade ago, while they were both working with other bands in Liverpool. The two began writing songs together in their spare time, and liked the results so much that they decided to form a singing duo.

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Music Interviews
3:14 pm
Thu November 15, 2012

Ron Wood's Funky Contribution To The Stones Canon

Rolling Stones guitarist Ron Wood says 1980's "Dance (Pt. 1)," which he helped write, was designed to get people moving.
Michael Loccisano Getty Images

Originally published on Fri November 16, 2012 10:55 am

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World Cafe
2:53 pm
Thu November 15, 2012

Titus Andronicus On World Cafe

Titus Andronicus.
Kyle Dean Reinford

The New Jersey band Titus Andronicus doesn't shy away from big ideas: It's named for Shakespeare's first tragedy, and its last record (2010's The Monitor) is a concept album drawing on the history of the Civil War. The group's big, shambling rock 'n' roll doesn't mess around with the everyday, opting instead for life-and-death urgency.

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The Two-Way
2:44 pm
Thu November 15, 2012

Al Gore: Most Americans Still Agree Climate Change Is Getting Worse

Former Vice President Al Gore.
Jon Kalish NPR

Originally published on Sat November 17, 2012 6:04 pm

Climate change and the environment were not major topics of the presidential campaign. And on Wednesday, President Obama said that while he believes more needs to be done to address what's happening, he won't "ignore jobs and growth simply to address climate change."

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The Salt
2:31 pm
Thu November 15, 2012

Cheaper Fruits And Vegetables Alone Can't Save Food Deserts

Five days a week, the Peaches & Greens truck sells affordable fruits and vegetables to families on public assistance, people without a car, homebound seniors and even local workers who otherwise would grab fast food or candy for a snack.
Carlos Osorio AP

Originally published on Thu November 15, 2012 4:12 pm

Tens of millions of Americans can't follow the government's guidelines for healthful eating because they can't afford or access enough fresh fruits and vegetables. Sometimes it's because they live in what's known as a "food desert," places devoid of markets with a good variety of quality fresh foods.

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