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Bill Chappell

Bill Chappell is a writer and producer who currently works on The Two Way, NPR's flagship news portal. In the past, he has edited and coordinated digital features for Morning Edition and Fresh Air, in addition to editing the rundown of All Things Considered. He frequently contributes to other NPR blogs, such as All Tech Considered and The Salt.

Chappell's work at NPR has ranged from being the site's first full-time homepage editor to being the lead writer and editor on the London 2012 Olympics blog, The Torch. His assignments have included being the lead web producer for NPR's trip to Asia's Grand Trunk Road, as well as establishing the Peabody Award-winning StoryCorps on NPR.org.

In 2009, Chappell was a key editorial member of the small team that redesigned NPR's web site. One year later, the site won its first Peabody Award, along with the National Press Foundation's Excellence in Online Journalism award.

At NPR, Chappell has trained both digital and radio staff to use digital tools to tell compelling stories, in addition to "evangelizing" — promoting more collaboration between legacy and digital departments.

Prior to joining NPR in late 2003, Chappell worked on the Assignment Desk at CNN International, handling coverage in areas from the Middle East, Asia, Africa, Europe, and Latin America, and coordinating CNN's pool coverage out of Qatar during the Iraq war.

Chappell's work for CNN also included producing Web stories and editing digital video for SI.com, and editing and producing stories for CNN.com's features division.

Before joining CNN, Chappell wrote about movies, restaurants and music for alternative weeklies, in addition to his first job: editing the police blotter.

A holder of bachelor's degrees in English and History from the University of Georgia, he attended graduate school for English Literature at the University of South Carolina.

Friday night brought more protests against Donald Trump's White House win, with marchers taking to the streets in cities from Miami and Atlanta to San Francisco. In Portland, Ore., police say a man was shot on a bridge by a suspect who then fled.

The jury in the case of former University of Cincinnati Police Officer Ray Tensing, who shot and killed an unarmed man in July of 2015, says it can't reach a unanimous verdict on murder and manslaughter charges. Tensing had initially stopped Sam DuBose for a missing front license plate; moments later, he shot him at point-blank range.

The Taliban says one of its operatives caused a large explosion at NATO's largest military base in Afghanistan. Defense Secretary Ash Carter says the apparent suicide bomber killed four Americans — two service members and two contractors — and wounded 17 others.

The bombing comes two days after a German diplomatic mission in northern Afghanistan also suffered a deadly suicide attack.

Stories from the frontlines of war — and from the descendants of military families — are being told on this Veterans Day, as America honors those who've worn its uniforms and promised to protect it. The conversation also centers on how the U.S. can return the obligation, and serve its veterans.

A Moscow court has upheld a move to block LinkedIn by regulators who say the professional network collects and stores data on Russians — without storing that data on a server in Russia, as required by law. The ruling could have a ripple effect that touches Facebook, Twitter and other tech giants.

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