Robin Hilton

Robin Hilton is the producer and co-host for the popular NPR Music show All Songs Considered.

In addition to his work on All Songs, Hilton produces NPR Music live concerts and festival coverage across the country, including live broadcasts and webcasts from the Bonnaroo and Sasquatch festivals, South by Southwest and the Newport Folk Festival.

Prior to joining NPR in 2000, Hilton co-founded Small Good Thing Productions, a non-profit production company for independent film, radio and music in Athens, GA.

Hilton lived and worked in Japan as a translator for the government, and taught English as a second language to junior high school students.

From 1989 to 1996, Hilton worked for NPR member stations KANU and WUGA as a senior producer and assistant news director and was a long-time contributing reporter to NPR's daily news programs All Things Considered and Morning Edition.

Hilton is a multi-instrumentalist and composer. His original scores have appeared in work from National Geographic, Center Stage and, most recently, in the documentary film Open Secret. You can hear some of his music here.

Along the way, Hilton worked as an emergency room orderly, a blackjack dealer and a fruitcake factory assembly lineman.

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All Songs Considered
9:03 am
Fri September 20, 2013

First Watch: Lucy Schwartz, 'Boomerang'

A dog plays trombone in a new video for the song "Boomerang," by Los Angeles singer Lucy Schwartz.
Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Fri September 20, 2013 11:10 am

I won't lie to you. I love anthropomorphizing dogs. Maybe it's because I like dogs more than people, but need to believe they're somewhat human in order to sustain the kind of long conversations about life and music I have with my own yellow lab, Cornflake (not her real name), without feeling insane.

All of which is to say that when I saw this new video for the song "Boomerang" by Los Angeles singer Lucy Schwartz, I immediately fell in love.

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All Songs Considered
12:30 pm
Mon September 16, 2013

Question Of The Week: Does Your College Roommate's Music Drive You Nuts?

All Songs Considered
7:03 am
Wed September 11, 2013

First Watch: Polyphonic Spree, 'Raise Your Head'

A man calmly opens a bag of pretzels while another is mauled by a tiger in this scene from The Polyphonic Spree's "Raise Your Head" video.
Courtesy of the artists

Originally published on Wed September 11, 2013 7:56 am

The inventor and engineer Rube Goldberg was known for designing elaborate machines that performed simple tasks, usually in a string of successive events, each one triggering the next. His work has been the inspiration for a lot of fantastic art and music videos (think of OK Go's "This Too Shall Pass," or A-Trak's "Tuna Melt").

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All Songs Considered
3:20 pm
Thu August 29, 2013

'The Worse Things Get': Life Lessons From Neko Case

Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Sun September 1, 2013 4:51 pm

  • Listen To Neko Case Discuss Her New Album

On her latest album, The Worse Things Get, The Harder I Fight, The Harder I Fight, The More I Love You, singer Neko Case lays her heart — and her healthy sense of humor — bare. It's a deeply personal record that, among other things, offers intimate, sometimes wry meditations on the recent loss of both of her parents and a grandmother. NPR Music's Stephen Thompson and I spoke with Neko Case about the music, and shared questions from listeners, in this interview that we originally webcast live on Aug. 29.

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All Songs Considered
2:39 am
Wed August 28, 2013

Okkervil River: Coming Of Age In Small Town America

Click to see an interactive map of Meriden, N.H., with stories from Okkervil River's Will Sheff about his childhood there.
William Schaff

Originally published on Thu August 29, 2013 3:15 pm

I grew up in a town of about 6,000 people in rural Kansas back in the '70s and '80s. I've never romanticized it much, though it was certainly a simpler time and, for better or worse, it's where I learned to make some sense of my life. The world you inhabit when you come of age in your teen years has a way of digging its claws in you. As the years pass, no matter how far you try to get away from it, it stays with you. The people, the places, the sounds and even the smells become a part of your DNA.

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