Scott Neuman

Scott Neuman works as a Digital News writer and editor, handling breaking news and feature stories for Occasionally he can be heard on-air reporting on stories for Newscasts and has done several radio features since he joined NPR in April 2007, as an editor on the Continuous News Desk.

Neuman brings to NPR years of experience as an editor and reporter at a variety of news organizations and based all over the world. For three years in Bangkok, Thailand, he served as an Associated Press Asia-Pacific desk editor. From 2000-2004, Neuman worked as a Hong Kong-based Asia editor and correspondent for The Wall Street Journal. He spent the previous two years as the international desk editor at the AP, while living in New York.

As the United Press International's New Delhi-based correspondent and bureau chief, Neuman covered South Asia from 1995-1997. He worked for two years before that as a freelance radio reporter in India, filing stories for NPR, PRI and the Canadian Broadcasting System. In 1991, Neuman was a reporter at NPR Member station WILL in Champaign-Urbana, IL. He started his career working for two years as the operations director and classical music host at NPR member station WNIU/WNIJ in DeKalb/Rockford, IL.

Reporting from Pakistan immediately following the September 11, 2001 attacks, Neuman was part of the team that earned the Pulitzer Prize awarded to The Wall Street Journal for overall coverage of 9/11 and the aftermath. Neuman shared in several awards won by AP for coverage of the December 2004 Asian tsunami.

A graduate from Purdue University, Neuman earned a Bachelor's degree in communications and electronic journalism.

Two years after the United States deployed the Patriot missile defense system to Turkey, a NATO ally, the system will be withdrawn, the countries announced today.

In a joint statement, Turkey and the U.S. said that the air-defense units would be withdrawn in October, when the original two-year mandate expires. The statement reads, in part:

More than 80 people were killed in a series of Syrian government airstrikes on a marketplace in a rebel-held neighborhood in the capital, Damascus, according to a U.K.-based monitoring group.

More bodies were pulled from the wreckage of last week's industrial explosion southeast of Beijing, raising the official death toll to 112, even as nearly 100 others were still missing, officials said.

Chinese authorities said that 85 of the 95 people unaccounted for were firefighters who responded to Wednesday's massive explosions at a warehouse housing hazardous chemicals.

Updated at 1:15 p.m. ET

Julian Bond, a key civil rights activist and anti-war campaigner who helped found the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee and later served for years as the chairman of the NAACP, has died at age 75.

The Southern Poverty Law Center, where Bond served as president in the 1970s, announced his death in a statement on Sunday. The SPLC said Bond died Saturday evening in Fort Walton Beach, Fla.

Updated at 9:30 p.m. ET

An Indonesian twin-turboprop plane carrying 54 passengers and crew reportedly crashed in the country's mountainous and densely wooded Papua province, according to the Transportation Ministry.

There was no distress call from the Trigana Air Service ATR42-300. A search plane spotted the wreckage on Monday morning, the Associated Press reports; there is not yet any word on whether there were any survivors.