Arts & Culture

Around the Nation
3:37 pm
Sun August 19, 2012

Living Above The Past: Museum Opens Up To Tenants

As a living history museum, Strawbery Banke allows visitors to tour historic buildings constructed between 1695 and 1954.
Amanda Loder for NPR

Originally published on Sun August 19, 2012 5:20 pm

All it takes to enter a time warp in New Hampshire is $15 and a summer afternoon. Spanning more than 250 years of American history, Strawbery Banke is the oldest neighborhood in the state's oldest city, Portsmouth.

It's kind of like Virginia's Colonial Williamsburg — lite. Stationed inside many of the 37 homes are re-enactors in different period garb. Inside a hulking white house, it's 1872.

Read more
Author Interviews
3:32 pm
Sun August 19, 2012

Long After Katrina, New Orleans Fights For 'Home'

Alex Brandon

Originally published on Sun August 19, 2012 5:20 pm

In just a few weeks, we will mark the seventh anniversary of one of the country's deadliest hurricanes. New Orleans and the Gulf Coast are still recovering from the devastating damage and loss of life caused by Hurricanes Katrina and Rita — the storm that would follow.

Read more
Arts & Life
5:21 am
Sun August 19, 2012

'Gone With The Wind' Author's Estate A Windfall

Originally published on Sun August 19, 2012 1:41 pm

Transcript

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC, "TARA'S THEME")

LINDA WERTHEIMER, HOST:

Read more
Author Interviews
5:21 am
Sun August 19, 2012

The 'State Of England' Is Grim In 'Lionel Asbo'

Martin Amis is the author of London Fields, Time's Arrow and The Rachel Papers.
Isabel Fonseca

Originally published on Sun August 19, 2012 1:41 pm

Martin Amis' latest novel is his 15th work of fiction. His books are comical, raunchy, full of flashy language and a sense of something new being done. And in Lionel Asbo: State of England, the titular Lionel is vicious, violent and very funny.

Read more
Sunday Puzzle
2:15 am
Sun August 19, 2012

Shuffle The Anagram, K?

NPR Graphic

Originally published on Sun August 19, 2012 1:41 pm

On-air challenge: This week's puzzle is called "Anagram K-pers." Every answer is a familiar word starting with the letter "K." You identify the words from their anagrams. For example, K + vane will make "knave."

Last week's challenge: Name two insects. Read the names one after the other. Insert an "H" somewhere in this string of letters, and you'll complete a familiar word that is the opposite of what either of these insects is. What word is it?

Answer: Behemoth (bee, moth)

Read more

Pages