Arts & Culture

Commentary
7:40 am
Sat July 26, 2014

We Can Be Heroes β€” With Some Glue And A Little Fabric

Twelve-year-old Hayley Lindsay spent almost a month working with her dad on this Toothless the Dragon costume. There are sawn-off crutches in the front legs so she can comfortably walk on all fours.
Petra Mayer

Originally published on Sat July 26, 2014 10:40 am

The San Diego Comic-Con is in full swing β€” celebrating not just comics, but movies, TV, books, video games and really cool costumes. It's called cosplay: the art and science of dressing up like your favorite character.

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The Salt
7:35 am
Sat July 26, 2014

Forget The Fishing Boat: Alaskans Scoop Up Salmon With Dipnets

Using dipnets --€” which have nets up to 5 feet in diameter at the end --€” isn't easy, and the river can get pretty crowded. Robert Carter, a novice dipnetter, holds up the first fish he caught after a day on the Kenai River.
Annie Feidt Alaska Public Media

Originally published on Sat July 26, 2014 11:38 am

Fishing purists, be warned. This story is not for you.

Yes, it's about salmon fishing on a scenic river in Alaska. But no one here is hooking a prize fish in the remote wilderness. This kind of fishing is all about crowds and slop buckets and big contraptions called dipnets β€” and the lengths Alaskans will go to in order to fill their freezers with sockeye salmon.

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Author Interviews
7:35 am
Sat July 26, 2014

Plot To Poison Famed French Wine Makes For Gripping (Pinot) Noir

Originally published on Sat July 26, 2014 12:32 pm

RomanΓ©e-Conti β€” a legendary French vineyard β€” produces one of the most elegant and extravagantly-priced wines in the world. In January 2010, proprietor Aubert de Villaine received a threat to his livelihood, if not his life: Pay more than 1 million euros in ransom, or his Burgundy vines would be poisoned.

Maximillian Potter first wrote about this plot for Vanity Fair and has now authored a book called Shadows in the Vineyard: The True Story of the Plot to Poison the World's Greatest Wine.

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Movies
7:34 am
Sat July 26, 2014

Silent Film Fans Make Some Noise To Help ID Forgotten Treasures

The Library of Congress started their Mostly Lost workshop to help identify films from its archives. The event also includes presentations from early film experts like Serge Bromberg, who this year recreated the stage performance that was part of the 1914 animated film Gertie the Dinosaur.
Bill Dragga Courtesy of the Library of Congress

Originally published on Sat July 26, 2014 1:06 pm

Deep in the archives of the Library of Congress' Culpeper, Va., film preservation center lie thousands of movies in cool, climate-controlled vaults. Hundreds are a century old or older, and unidentified. Their titles have been lost over the years and the library knows little about them, so it started inviting fans of early film to a yearly event called Mostly Lost to help figure out what they are.

And you know what? Those fans are rowdy.

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Code Switch
5:34 am
Sat July 26, 2014

Dueling Markets Show Native American Art Is Big Business

An estimated 175,000 people travel to New Mexico in August to view Native American art.
Larry Lamsa Flickr

The 93rd annual Santa Fe Indian Market is only a month away. It's the biggest and best-known destination for Native artists and Native art collectors on the planet, and this year, it's got competition β€” a new event called the Indigenous Fine Arts Market.

Native American art and culture is big business. If you don't believe that, look no further than the controversial or illegal sides of the market. If you've been paying attention over the last year, you've seen some lurid and fascinating headlines:

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