NPR Music

Deceptive Cadence
12:19 pm
Tue May 15, 2012

Kathleen Ferrier: A Voice Not Forgotten

The English contralto Kathleen Ferrier had a voice like no other. She was born 100 years ago.
Decca

Originally published on Tue May 15, 2012 12:48 pm

One hundred years ago, a musical marvel was born. She grew up in a tiny hamlet in the North of England, but made a huge impression on the world of classical music.

"Unique" is an overused word, yet it truly fits the sound of Kathleen Ferrier's voice. If you've never heard it, prepare to be amazed — stop reading now and click on the link below.

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Live Fridays From XPN
11:43 am
Tue May 15, 2012

Dar Williams In Concert

Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Thu May 17, 2012 10:01 am

It isn't folksinger Dar Williams' first time performing at one of WXPN's Live Friday concerts — she was on the stage with country star Allison Moorer last year — and it won't be her last. Williams began her foray into folk music while in Boston, making the coffee-shop rounds and recording her own demos.

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Mountain Stage
10:12 am
Tue May 15, 2012

In Memoriam: Everett Lilly On Mountain Stage

Courtesy of the artist

Everett Lilly's voice was a thing of natural beauty. When he sang, and even when he talked, you heard the sound of those Southern West Virginia mountains he loved. He was a bigger-than-life personality you never forgot, whether you met him on the street or heard him on the stage. Lilly died of complications from an aneurysm on May 8. He was 87.

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All Songs Considered Blog
10:02 am
Tue May 15, 2012

Mucca Pazza, 'Boss Taurus': Big Band, Itty-Bitty Stage

Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Tue May 15, 2012 2:51 pm

Take a humongous group of excitable jokers who have too much free time on their hands, mix in enough instruments to satisfy an entire marching band variety, toss a few gigantic pom poms and enormously-loud/elaborate outfits their way and you'll get Mucca Pazza. The Chicago-based band is a 30-piece (yes, 30 trombonists, trumpeters, guitarists, cheerleaders, and more) community of "circus punks" that makes music that sounds like the results of a rowdy weekend at band camp.

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Song Of The Day
6:03 am
Tue May 15, 2012

Louis Armstrong: With Love And Grace, A Final 'Hello'

In January 1971, in one of his final performances, Louis Armstrong used "Hello Dolly" to convey the joy of being alive.
Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Tue May 15, 2012 5:07 pm

It was one of his final live performances. On Jan. 29, 1971, 69-year-old Louis Armstrong walked onto the stage at the National Press Club to accept an award. He'd planned to perform a couple of numbers and was under doctor's orders not to break out his trumpet, but Armstrong couldn't resist putting on a memorable show. He sang in a voice more gravelly than ever, blew his horn and played a few of his classics, starting with his rendition of "Hello Dolly."

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