NPR Music

Marian McPartland's Piano Jazz
11:22 am
Fri August 9, 2013

Jimmy Heath On Piano Jazz

Jimmy Heath.
Lonnie Timmons III Getty Images

Originally published on Mon August 12, 2013 7:20 am

Saxophonist, composer and NEA Jazz Master Jimmy Heath is the middle child of an illustrious jazz family, the Heath Brothers. A bebop player and big-band leader, Heath also performed with Miles Davis, Dizzy Gillespie and John Coltrane.

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Song Travels
11:16 am
Fri August 9, 2013

Madeleine Peyroux On 'Song Travels'

Madeleine Peyroux.
Mary Ellen Mark Courtesy of the artist

Vocalist Madeleine Peyroux started out busking on the streets of Paris, but went on to gain international acclaim for her versions of beloved folk tunes and jazz standards. Her latest album, The Blue Room, honors the legacy of artists such as Ray Charles and Leonard Cohen with interpretations of their songs.

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Deceptive Cadence
10:51 am
Fri August 9, 2013

Throwing A Fit In F-Sharp

Pablo Helguera for NPR

Got an idea for a classical cartoon or a reaction to this one? Leave your thoughts in the comments section.

Pablo Helguera is a New York-based artist working with sculpture, drawing, photography and performance. His new book is Helguera's Artunes. You can see more of his work at Artworld Salon and on his own site.

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The Record
10:13 am
Fri August 9, 2013

Inside Listening: The Mountain Goats' Bassist On His Own Band's Albums

Peter Hughes (left) and John Darnielle of The Mountain Goats.
D.L. Anderson Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Fri August 9, 2013 1:44 pm

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Music News
10:02 am
Fri August 9, 2013

Remembering The People's Throat Singer Of Tuva

Kongar-Ol Ondar at the 72nd Annual Academy Awards in Los Angeles. Genghis Blues was nominated for an Oscar for Best Documentary Short.
Scott Nelson Getty Images.

Originally published on Fri August 9, 2013 10:57 am

The technique known as throat singing is an ancient style still practiced in Tuva, a small republic between Siberia and Mongolia's Gobi desert. Traditionally, it was practiced by herders.

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