NPR Music

Favorite Sessions
9:22 am
Wed April 17, 2013

KCRW Presents: Rhye

Rhye lit some candles and then dimmed the lights for their performance on KCRW.
KCRW

Originally published on Mon July 7, 2014 2:15 pm

For Rhye's first-ever radio performance, we turned the lights down and lit some candles to get in the mood. We were curious to hear how the band — the project of producer Robin Hannibal and singer Mike Milosh — would translate the intimacy of its sensual, soulful music into a live setting. With the help of incredible backing players, including a string section, Hannibal and Milosh pulled off a romantic, moving set.

Watch Rhye's entire session at KCRW.com.

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Shots - Health News
9:04 am
Wed April 17, 2013

For Those About To Rock, We Salute Your Ears

Musician Jake Orrall performs onstage at the Coachella Valley Music & Arts Festival on April 14. Temporary hearing loss following concerts and other loud events may protect our ears from more permanent damage.
Frazer Harrison Getty Images for Coachella

Originally published on Wed April 17, 2013 4:33 pm

If you went to Coachella last weekend, you probably had a ball. But will your ears pay the price?

While short-term hearing loss caused by loud noise can be unnerving, it may not be an automatic sign of permanent damage.

Temporary hearing loss may actually be the ear's way of protecting itself from lasting damage, suggests a study published Monday in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

Well, if you're a mouse, at any rate.

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Music Documentaries
8:54 am
Wed April 17, 2013

Morton Subotnick And Joan La Barbara On Q2 Music's 'Spaces'

Morton Subotnick in his studio.
WQXR

Originally published on Wed July 9, 2014 10:56 am

It's difficult to overstate Morton Subotnick and Joan La Barbara's contributions to contemporary music.

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All Songs Considered
7:03 am
Wed April 17, 2013

Glenn Jones' Bittersweet 'Farewell' To A Family Home

Courtesy of the artist

It's incredibly calming to watch Glenn Jones play acoustic guitar. Whether he's appearing by the train tracks or in one of our Tiny Desk Concerts, there's nothing flashy about his style, only careful consideration as he gently hops over the frets like a lily-padding frog.

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A Blog Supreme
3:27 pm
Tue April 16, 2013

How Taxes And Moving Changed The Sound Of Jazz

The bebop innovator Dizzy Gillespie on 52nd Street in New York, which was filled with small jazz clubs in the 1940s.
William Gottlieb The Library of Congress

This week — when many of us at NPR rushed to file our U.S. federal income-tax returns, then moved to a new headquarters — I'm reminded of a moment in jazz history. Namely, the mid-1940s, when a new style called bebop came into popularity.

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