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Music News
1:03 am
Tue October 16, 2012

Jason Lytle Balances The Studio And A Life Outdoors

Former Grandaddy frontman Jason Lytle just released a new album, Dept. of Disappearance.
Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Tue October 16, 2012 9:45 am

Jason Lytle is the man behind the Modesto, Calif., band Grandaddy. The band released its debut in 1997, but it was Grandaddy's second album — The Sophtware Slump — that broke through with critics and fans. Even David Bowie called himself a fan when he approached the band members after seeing them play.

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Tiny Desk Concerts
3:08 pm
Mon October 15, 2012

Dirty Three: Tiny Desk Concert

Dirty Three plays a Tiny Desk Concert on Sept. 24.
Lauren Rock NPR

Every member of Dirty Three has a highly respectable career outside of the band: Violinist Warren Ellis works closely with Nick Cave, drummer Jim White is a sought-after collaborator with an instantly recognizable sound, and guitarist Mick Turner has released a string of gorgeous instrumental solo albums when he's not working as a visual artis

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Mountain Stage
2:27 pm
Mon October 15, 2012

Joan Baez On Mountain Stage

Brian Blauser Mountain Stage

Originally published on Wed July 2, 2014 8:45 am

Ever since shortly after her famed performance at the 1959 Newport Folk Festival, Joan Baez has been an internationally known star, famous for classic albums and a career marked by social and political activism.

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World Cafe
2:09 pm
Mon October 15, 2012

Next: Allah-Las

Allah-Las.
Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Thu July 24, 2014 2:54 pm

  • Hear two new tracks from Allah-Las

The vintage sounds of Allah-Las combine the harmonies and hooks of the British Invasion with the atmosphere of a West Coast psychedelic band. Three of the group's four members met while working at the legendary record store Amoeba, where they discovered a mutual love for '60s rock and the beach.

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A Blog Supreme
12:31 pm
Mon October 15, 2012

'Treme,' Ep. 25: Sugar Boy's Salute

Big Chief Albert Lambreaux (Clarke Peters, center) has his Mardi Gras Indian practice interrupted by a visit from members of the Creole Wild West tribe.
Paul Schiraldi HBO

Originally published on Mon October 15, 2012 1:41 pm

If you're one of the few viewers still confused about what Treme is saying about art, do note this episode's "play-within-a-play" staging of Samuel Beckett's Waiting for Godot. The existentialist play revolves around two characters, Vladimir (nicknamed Didi) and Estragon (called Gogo), who wait interminably for a mysterious "Godot" by a desolate country road. It's clearly meant to parallel New Orleans residents' wait for essential social services, complete with the barren backdrop of the city post-Katrina.

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